Fall, Winter & Spring

Eastport invites you to discover our year-round magic

Autumn in Way DownEast offers an unexpected double color eruption to captivate adventurous visitors. As the days become shorter and cooler, the hardwoods and marshes explode into color. White and gray birches, ash and poplars turn bright gold and yellow. Maples, oaks and sumac turn an intense crimson and brilliant scarlet. The dark bluish green pines and spruces against the dark green firs create a natural backdrop for Nature’s spectacle. 

The second color outburst of autumn is like a royal red carpet rolling alongside U.S. Route 1 and many of the inland country roads of Washington County. As the temperatures turn colder hundreds of acres of blueberry barrens turn a dark crimson, then suddenly transform into remarkable hues of red and purple. This is Mother Nature’s way of protecting the blueberry plants against the harsh winter. In the spring the plants will magically turn green and begin the process of producing their delicious berries.

The first snowfall in DownEast Maine is always unpredictable. Many deer hunters prefer to have snow during the month of November, all the better to track their prey. Once the snow becomes established summer hiking trails are groomed for snowmobiles and ATVs, along with dedicated cross country skiing and snow shoeing trails. The 87 mile Down East Sunrise Trail runs between Calais and Ellsworth. The abandon railroad bed is open in the winter to registered motorize vehicles, cross country skiers and snow shoeing. Cobscook Bay State Park offers groomed cross country ski trails and a small skating pond. When conditions permit, the Park holds a Family Fun Day with cross country skiing, ice skating and sled rides. In mid-February, Stronghearts holds a "Winter Sports & Fun" day at the Pottle Tree Farm in Perry with winter sports equipment provided by the Washington County Community College. Keep an eye out on their web pages or Facebook.  

Discover one of the most unique New Year's Celebration in the country at the Tides Institute & Museum of Art in Eastport. A dual celebration marks Canada's New Year with a Maple Leaf drop from the Museum building at 11:00 p.m. EST (12:00 AM Atlantic Time) and the U.S.'s New Year with the dropping of the 8-foot sardine at 12:00 am EST. Town-wide events and fireworks round out this festive night. Information is posted online closer to the event date.  This event has been covered by CNN, the New York Times, and the Travel Network.

Spring Way DownEast sneaks up on you. Just when you were getting used to the peace and quiet of winter with its rolling gentle sea smoke and snow squalls crossing the bay into Canada, flowers begin to push their way up through the warming ground and trees reveal hints of budding out. Although winters on the coast tend to be somewhat warmer than inland areas, the same ocean influence delays spring just a bit. It is common to see sweet smelling lilacs blooming along the I-95 corridor in early June, and then, a week or two later, on the coast. As the days grow warmer and longer, the crimson blueberry barrens turn green and the hardwood forest begins to sprout leaves. Along the roadways lupines and dandelions begin to reappear and with them, the promise of summer. 

 

The four seasons of Way DownEast are as unique as they are beautiful. Each one offers something for everyone.